nabyss:

remotely-viewing-khemet:

“In December 2013, while most people were celebrating “peace on earth, good will toward men,” the U.S. State Department admitted that President Eisenhower authorized the murder of Congo’s first democratically-elected Prime Minister, Patrice Lumumba. CIA Chief, Allan Dulles, allocated $100,000 to accomplish the act. Lumumba’s murder has been called the most important assassination of an African in the 20th Century. How do U.S. citizens make up for this to the Congolese people and to Lumumba’s family?”
-Cynthia McKinney
https://www.facebook.com/CynthiaMcKinneyOfficial
Although I do not believe this is the fault of the average United States citizens, I do know that we are not taught about the real reasons why Africa is in the condition it is in.  
#CynthiaMcKinney

Not only them. Everyone was in this (UK spies were there as was Belgium..). Some even where in the house where the murder happened. The next President/Prime Minister of Congo where involved in that. Such a disgusting thing. And then some wonders why African countries aren’t where they should be? We have no choice. We are fucked no mater what by our previous “owners”, the FMI, the big companies, rich families….do people even know that the world is owned by only 147 companies with the majority belonging to less than 100 or even 50 families? Ugh.

nabyss:

remotely-viewing-khemet:

In December 2013, while most people were celebrating “peace on earth, good will toward men,” the U.S. State Department admitted that President Eisenhower authorized the murder of Congo’s first democratically-elected Prime Minister, Patrice Lumumba. CIA Chief, Allan Dulles, allocated $100,000 to accomplish the act. Lumumba’s murder has been called the most important assassination of an African in the 20th Century. How do U.S. citizens make up for this to the Congolese people and to Lumumba’s family?”

-Cynthia McKinney

https://www.facebook.com/CynthiaMcKinneyOfficial

Although I do not believe this is the fault of the average United States citizens, I do know that we are not taught about the real reasons why Africa is in the condition it is in.  

#CynthiaMcKinney

Not only them. Everyone was in this (UK spies were there as was Belgium..). Some even where in the house where the murder happened. The next President/Prime Minister of Congo where involved in that. Such a disgusting thing. And then some wonders why African countries aren’t where they should be? We have no choice. We are fucked no mater what by our previous “owners”, the FMI, the big companies, rich families….do people even know that the world is owned by only 147 companies with the majority belonging to less than 100 or even 50 families? Ugh.

(via lagos-2-bahia-deactivated201408)

Tags: lumumba congo usa

So this dude went to Vietnam to study PTSD in American Soldiers and instead wrote a book about the massacres they committed.  (warning: big picture of dead bodies if you click on that.)

How did high-level policies connect down to village level atrocities?
The Vietnam War was fought using an attrition strategy. This wasn’t a war like World War I, where you had two armies facing off across a well defined battlefield. It’s a guerrilla struggle, where the Vietnamese revolutionaries are radically outgunned. So they’re not going to stand toe to toe with the Americans. And the Americans aren’t trying to take territory or capture an enemy capital. 

They were searching for some metric, some measure to show that they were winning a war. They settled on the attrition strategy which was used during the second half of the Korean War, and the main measure was body count. You would kill your way to victory by piling up Vietnamese bodies, and the Americans were always chasing this crossover point when they would be killing more Vietnamese guerrillas than the enemy could put into the field. And the idea was that at that moment, the enemy would give up the fight. 

Because they would view the war as a rational effort the way the Pentagon did: this was a ledger sheet. And once the debits outweighed the credits, then they would end the war. 

globalvoices:


“They couldn’t arrest everyone if they all insulted the King on Twitter. Or could they…?”

Six Twitter users have been sentenced to a year in prison each by a Bahrain court for allegedly “misusing freedoms of expression” and “defaming His Majesty the King.”
Bahrain Jails Six Twitter Users for Insulting King
 

globalvoices:

“They couldn’t arrest everyone if they all insulted the King on Twitter. Or could they…?”

Six Twitter users have been sentenced to a year in prison each by a Bahrain court for allegedly “misusing freedoms of expression” and “defaming His Majesty the King.”

Bahrain Jails Six Twitter Users for Insulting King

 

"Under ‘the Chalabis’ the purge went far wider than actual members of the Ba’ath Party. Anyone with a grieviance would accuse a rival of being a Ba’ath sympathiser. Conversely, the best proof of anti-Ba’ath purity was membership of a former opposition party, preferably one aligned with the minister. Ironically, occupation policies created the very problems they were supposed to solve."

Fuel on the Fire by Greg Muttitt


There’s an entire chapter called ‘Invasion of the Chalabis’

"The fate of the National Museum and archaeological sites prompted an international outcry, but not the destruction of Iraq’s schools, universities or government offices, nor even the loss of archives, manuscripts or public records. The fundamental difference was the archaeological treasures from beneath Iraq’s soil had value to foreigners, whereas the others were only of immediate value to Iraqis. National Museum director Donny George reports that before the war he heard from reliable sources that some British archaeologists and collectors were saying that Iraqis did not understand the value of their archaeological remains and so did not “deserve” them; they should instead be brought to Britain."

from Fuel on the Fire by Greg Muttitt.

This book is really well researched.  Expect more posts about it.

kolkhara:

kolkhara:

US State Department document (click here) illustrating the role National Endowment for Democracy (NED)-funded NGOs play in supporting US-backed opposition figures in Venezuela. The US regularly fails to transparently list who is included in extensive funding NED provides opposition groups in Venezeula, so documents like this give a rare glimpse into the names and dynamics actually involved. As was suspected, NED money is going into networks providing support for current presidential candidate, Henrique Capriles Radonski.  In this particular document, NED-funded Sumate’s legal trouble is described in relation to its attempted defense of Radonski. At the time this document was written, Radonski was in jail pending trial for his role in facilitating the 2002 US-backed failed coup against President Hugo Chavez.

I posted this a month ago and I feel it is relevant today.

kolkhara:

kolkhara:

US State Department document (click here) illustrating the role National Endowment for Democracy (NED)-funded NGOs play in supporting US-backed opposition figures in Venezuela. The US regularly fails to transparently list who is included in extensive funding NED provides opposition groups in Venezeula, so documents like this give a rare glimpse into the names and dynamics actually involved. As was suspected, NED money is going into networks providing support for current presidential candidate, Henrique Capriles Radonski.  In this particular document, NED-funded Sumate’s legal trouble is described in relation to its attempted defense of Radonski. At the time this document was written, Radonski was in jail pending trial for his role in facilitating the 2002 US-backed failed coup against President Hugo Chavez.

I posted this a month ago and I feel it is relevant today.

(via isqineeha)

Tags: venezuela usa

"

Today as the United States continues to intensify its international economic sanctions programme against Iran, it is worth revisiting the catastrophic harm which a previous sanctions campaign against Saddam Hussein’s Iraq had upon that country. While the sanctions failed to remove Saddam from power and by many accounts helped him solidify his grip on the country by keeping the overwhelming majority of the population focused purely on subsistence, they took a calculatedly devastating toll on Iraqi civilians.

Between 1989 and 1996 per capita income in the country dropped from $3,510 to below $450, a drop caused primarily by the rapid currency depreciation of the Iraq dinar due to financial sanctions against the country’s central bank. Prices of basic commodities soared, with staples such as wheat, sugar and rice increasing several hundred-fold in a matter of months. From having a relatively modern economy fuelled primarily by oil income, by the year 2000 over 60 per cent of Iraqis were reliant on food rations for their daily sustenance.

Over the course of 10 years of financial sanctions the Iraqi dinar suffered catastrophic collapse, falling from four dinars to one US dollar in 1991 to over 2,100 dinars to the dollar by 2001.

The rapidly deteriorating economic environment due to sanctions had the necessary side-effect of severely undermining the Iraqi education system, which had been funded through oil revenues and had heretofore succeeded in producing historically high literacy rates among both the male and female populations.

According to a study published just before the beginning of the second Iraq War, an estimated one in five Iraqi children stopped attending school between the years 1990 and 1998, and the phenomena of child labour became widely prevalent despite being virtually non-existent just a decade prior. As families were forced into destitution by the country’s faltering currency, the development gains of the previous decades were lost and as the report described it, “Iraqi society was put back by 50 years”.

Compounding the devastation to the economy and to general human development within the country, the Iraqi healthcare system, at one time considered to be the best in the Middle East, was shattered by an embargo on medical supplies to the country. Infant mortality more than quadrupled, as doctors were rendered unable to provide care for easily treatable childhood illnesses.

"

Sanctioning Society, From Iraq to Iran, Murtaza Hussain

Implementing sanctions do nothing to threaten the power of leaders, but instead they harm the population and worsen the hand-to-mouth relationship between government and its citizens. How many more societies must the west demolish before this becomes clear?

(via eastafrodite)

(Source: maarnayeri, via kadalkavithaigal)

 Iraq: After the Americans | AJE


In keeping with Barack Obama’s presidential campaign promise, the US has withdrawn its troops from Iraq and by the end of 2012 US spending in Iraq will be just five per cent of what it was at its peak in 2008.

In a special two-part series, Fault Lines travels across Iraq to take the pulse of a country and its people after nine years of foreign occupation and nation-building.

Now that US troops have left, how are Iraqis overcoming the legacy of violence and toxic remains of the US-led occupation, and the sectarian war it ignited? Is the country on the brink of irreparable fragmentation?

Correspondent Sebastian Walker first went to Baghdad in June 2003 and spent the next several years reporting un-embedded from Iraq. In the first part of this Fault Lines series, he returns and travels from Basra to Baghdad to find out what kind of future Iraqis are forging for themselves.

Part two here.

(Source: youtu.be)

Tags: iraq usa obama

"

The city of Fallujah remains under siege. Not from U.S. troops, but from a deluge of birth defects that have plagued families since the use of depleted uranium and white phosphorus by U.S. forces in 2004. No government studies have provided a direct link to the use of these weapons because no government studies have been undertaken, and none are contemplated.

Dr. Samira Alani, a pediatric specialist at Fallujah General Hospital, told Al Jazeera, “We have all kinds of defects now, ranging from congenital heart disease to severe physical abnormalities, both in numbers you cannot imagine. There are not even medical terms to describe some of these conditions because we’ve never seen them until now.”

"

Eleven Years Later, We Are Still at War via buffleheadcabin

I never even HEARD about this…

(via goodbyeolepaint)

(via buffleheadcabin)

Tags: iraq usa

Words of Women from the Egyptian Revolution - Bahrain Special | Episode 9: Maryam Alkhawaja by Leilzahra

English & Spanish subs

I don’t have a post prepared for Iraqi revolution/independence day so I’m going to repost this piece from 2003 like I do every year.  

On the brink of war, both supporters and critics of United States policy on Iraq agree on the origins, at least, of the haunted relations that have brought us to this pass: America’s dealings with Saddam Hussein, justifiable or not, began some two decades ago with its shadowy, expedient support of his regime in the Iraq-Iran war of the 1980’s.

Both sides are mistaken. Washington’s policy traces an even longer, more shrouded and fateful history. Forty years ago , the Central Intelligence Agency, under President John F. Kennedy, conducted its own regime change in Baghdad, carried out in collaboration with Saddam Hussein.

The Iraqi leader seen as a grave threat in 1963 was Abdel Karim Kassem, a general who five years earlier had deposed the Western-allied Iraqi monarchy. Washington’s role in the coup went unreported at the time and has been little noted since. America’s anti-Kassem intrigue has been widely substantiated, however, in disclosures by the Senate Committee on Intelligence and in the work of journalists and historians like David Wise, an authority on the C.I.A.

Read the rest and never forget.

insaniyat:

nickturse:

Bahraini Shiite Muslim women take part in a Labour Day pro-democracy protest in the Manama suburb of Sanabis on May 1, 2012. Hundreds of demonstrators took to the streets of Shiite villages in Bahrain to demand being reinstated in jobs from which they were fired during last year’s uprising, witnesses said. [Getty]

Because there is still news from Bahrain…

insaniyat:

nickturse:

Bahraini Shiite Muslim women take part in a Labour Day pro-democracy protest in the Manama suburb of Sanabis on May 1, 2012. Hundreds of demonstrators took to the streets of Shiite villages in Bahrain to demand being reinstated in jobs from which they were fired during last year’s uprising, witnesses said. [Getty]

Because there is still news from Bahrain…

Tags: Bahrain KSA USA

"I have been stunned by the way Iraq has almost disappeared from public discourse in the US. The way in which the withdrawal narrative was packaged and sold to the American public sealed that fictitious “closure.” The discursive curtain is down (not that it was ever fully up anyway) and there isn’t much to discuss or bother about. The simplistic narrative goes as follows: “We” went there and tried to help build a democracy, but it didn’t work out for x reason. The x, of course, is usually some variation on an Orientalist myth. There is no serious debate about the war and no realization of the extent of its tragic effects on Iraqis and their future. Most importantly, there is no reckoning or recognition of the crime. The collective amnesia is horrendous. The architects of the war publish books and appear on TV shows as if nothing had happened."

— Sinan Antoon, The Barbarian Has to Keep It Real: Interview with Jadaliyya Co-Editor Sinan Antoon (via abudaii)

(via shergawia-deactivated20121108)

insaniyat:

indians-vs-cowboys:

February 24th, 2012, Bahrain’s Foreign Minister Sheikh Khaled bin Ahmed al-Khalifa and U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton at the “Friends of Syria” Conference in Tunis, Tunisia. (Photo AP)

Oh the hypocrisy…and to hold it in Tunisia of all places clinches the medal for irony. Hey, remember when Hillary said, “I really consider President and Mrs. Mubarak to be friends of my family. So I hope to see him often here in Egypt and in the United States.” in 2009? Then when asked about the future of the presidency she adamantly stated, “That’s for the people of Egypt to decide. That is a very important issue that really is up to Egyptians.”
Oh and btw, she said this in regards to the State Department’s annual human rights report, which is perennially critical of Egypt’s record in the context of an invitation for Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak to visit the United States.
I guess she must have not heard about the people of Bahrain deciding against the repressive Khalifa regime…

Do I even have to add a comment?

insaniyat:

indians-vs-cowboys:

February 24th, 2012, Bahrain’s Foreign Minister Sheikh Khaled bin Ahmed al-Khalifa and U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton at the “Friends of Syria” Conference in Tunis, Tunisia. (Photo AP)

Oh the hypocrisy…and to hold it in Tunisia of all places clinches the medal for irony. Hey, remember when Hillary said, “I really consider President and Mrs. Mubarak to be friends of my family. So I hope to see him often here in Egypt and in the United States.” in 2009? Then when asked about the future of the presidency she adamantly stated, “That’s for the people of Egypt to decide. That is a very important issue that really is up to Egyptians.”

Oh and btw, she said this in regards to the State Department’s annual human rights report, which is perennially critical of Egypt’s record in the context of an invitation for Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak to visit the United States.

I guess she must have not heard about the people of Bahrain deciding against the repressive Khalifa regime…

Do I even have to add a comment?

"This ship of shame should not be allowed to unload its dangerous cargo in Egypt, and there is a substantial risk that this is what it plans to do. There is a clear pattern that weapons from previous ships have recently been used to commit serious human rights violations by the Egyptian security forces, and yet the US is recklessly sending a constant flow of arms to Egypt."

— Brian Wood Amnesty International’s head of arms control on Amnesty International Press Release: Halt Ships of Shame from USA Carrying Weapons to Egypt (via sharquaouia)

(via sharquaouia-deactivated20121015)

Tags: Egypt USA