"In the last five months, a total of 1,300 dead bodies of migrant workers had been sent back home from various countries including Saudi Arabia, Malaysia, Qatar, United Arab Emirates, and Bahrain, officials said.
-
According to the Bureau of Manpower, Employment and Training (BMET), 2,878 dead bodies of migrant workers were sent home in 2012 and 2,585 in 2011."

1,300 Bengali migrant workers sent back dead in five months

And this is why Arabs or Muslims in general who’re so proud of the ‘progress’ and ‘development’ of these khaleeji states make me want to punch them. 

(via stay-human)

(via hummussexual)

fotojournalismus:

Anti-government protesters sit by the roadside with molotov cocktails as they wait for others to join during clashes after the Ashura procession in the village of Sanabis west of Manama, on November 15, 2013.
[Credit : Hamad I Mohammed/Reuters]

fotojournalismus:

Anti-government protesters sit by the roadside with molotov cocktails as they wait for others to join during clashes after the Ashura procession in the village of Sanabis west of Manama, on November 15, 2013.

[Credit : Hamad I Mohammed/Reuters]

(via ineskhalsa)

Tags: bahrain

humanrightswatch:


Bahrain: Detained Activists Allege Torture
Since late April, 2013, in separate cases, Bahraini security officials have allegedly tortured a prominent rights activist and a woman arrested for protesting the Formula 1 grand prix race in April, including with electric shocks, and forced them to sign confessions. The allegations emerged two weeks after the Bahraini authorities indefinitely postponed the visit of the United Nations (UN) special rapporteur on torture, Juan Mendez. The Bahrain Independent Commission of Inquiry report, issued in November 2011, concluded that five people detained in connection with protests earlier in 2011 had died as a result of torture in custody.
Read more. 

humanrightswatch:

Bahrain: Detained Activists Allege Torture

Since late April, 2013, in separate cases, Bahraini security officials have allegedly tortured a prominent rights activist and a woman arrested for protesting the Formula 1 grand prix race in April, including with electric shocks, and forced them to sign confessions. The allegations emerged two weeks after the Bahraini authorities indefinitely postponed the visit of the United Nations (UN) special rapporteur on torture, Juan Mendez. The Bahrain Independent Commission of Inquiry report, issued in November 2011, concluded that five people detained in connection with protests earlier in 2011 had died as a result of torture in custody.

Read more. 

Tags: bahrain

globalvoices:


“They couldn’t arrest everyone if they all insulted the King on Twitter. Or could they…?”

Six Twitter users have been sentenced to a year in prison each by a Bahrain court for allegedly “misusing freedoms of expression” and “defaming His Majesty the King.”
Bahrain Jails Six Twitter Users for Insulting King
 

globalvoices:

“They couldn’t arrest everyone if they all insulted the King on Twitter. Or could they…?”

Six Twitter users have been sentenced to a year in prison each by a Bahrain court for allegedly “misusing freedoms of expression” and “defaming His Majesty the King.”

Bahrain Jails Six Twitter Users for Insulting King

 

jayaprada:

Everyday, the Kuwaiti press publishes statements and reports coming from the interior ministry, meant to comfort their citizens: “We have arrested illegal immigrants” in this or that area, they say. These illegal immigrants were termed “illegal” once they left their employers, in an effort to escape exploitation, enslavement, sexual, physical and verbal abuse.

There is nothing groundbreaking in calling the migrant worker situation in the Gulf a clear example of modern slavery. State laws endow sponsors with complete control over the destinies of workers. This power granted to “citizens” necessarily produces corruption and the exploitation of others. To this very day, Gulf states fight against changing these unjust laws. They use cultural relativism to justify their resistance, saying, “Our traditions and religion do not allow us to let those housemaids live on their own!”

The issue of migrant workers in the Gulf is loaded with horrific stories of abuse and suicide, reported daily in the news. The way in which stories are reported, alone, stands as sufficient evidence of the racism and xenophobia that states practice, in their approach to migrant workers. They make sure to portray migrant workers as people at fault, or as ignorant and filthy, in order to deny audience sympathy and have it replaced with xenophobia.

There are numerous examples of reports in print and on TV that demonstrate the persecution of migrant workers in the Gulf. They are accused of abusing children and practicing “black magic” when, in reality, they are only victims of daily abuse. Saudi Arabia banned Indonesians, and Kuwait banned Bengalis. Why, do they say? Because they are too problematic; they object – they are not good slaves! Of course, that is not the official reason, because no official reasons are given.

Bahrain stands as a representative example of a country where this hate against migrant workers runs rampant. For Bahraini citizens, the first image that comes to mind at the mention of a migrant worker, is of someone who “looks” like they are from anywhere in South Asia.

In the Bahraini example, South Asians are either employed in the army, police and intelligence; or, they are underpaid workers with hard labor jobs. South Asians belonging to the law enforcement and military teams enflame xenophobic feelings among Bahrainis opposed to the regime and its political crimes; the hard laboring employees pay the price for this hate.

Some Bahrainis have spoken out about how migrant workers acted in sympathy with the citizens and how helpful they were, especially when the country was under emergency law in March 2011. However, this is not the picture that is promoted.

Several migrant workers have been killed in the last two years. Those opposing the current government accuse the regime of killing migrants in order to defame the revolution and provoke tensions, while the government accuses the “Shia” of taking revenge on the regime by killing workers.

Another example of xenophobia in the Gulf is afforded by the latest wave of gentrification in Kuwait. The Jleeb al-Shuyookh area is home to crime-filled ghettos, black market and expired food stalls, prostitution, residences of illegal workers, and so on. It is basically a workers’ escape from the unaffordable Kuwaiti hell. Kuwaitis have been calling for the demolition of this area because, it does not show off the country’s “civilized face.” They also want to use the land to build houses, since it is better placed on the map than many new and up-and-coming areas.

The Kuwaiti government is done waiting and has started the job; absolutely no one is speaking out against the demolition of this living space. Apparently, the so-called NGOs in and outside Kuwait do not see anything criminal in demolishing an entire area, specifically one where the working-class survive. The residents there often make less than 200 US dollars per month, have to support their families, and live with several others to secure housing. Now the state wants to pull them back into their Kuwaiti hell.

There is no escape, and they are expected to leave their jobs and live in-house with a master, as slaves. Civilization needs to be visible, everywhere; but only in concrete buildings, not in human rights.

(via haralambros)

auzubillah:

Anti-government protesters run to take cover from tear gas fired by riot police trying to disperse the march held in support of al-Quds day in a village on Sitra, south of Manama, August 17, 2012. Dozens of protesters staged al-Quds day rallies across villages in Bahrain as a show of support for the Palestinian people. Al-Quds day is held on the last Friday of the Muslim holy fasting month of Ramadan. REUTERS/Hamad I Mohammed
Bahrain’s Protest of Art & Photography | مسيرة البحرين للتصميم و التصوير

auzubillah:

Anti-government protesters run to take cover from tear gas fired by riot police trying to disperse the march held in support of al-Quds day in a village on Sitra, south of Manama, August 17, 2012. Dozens of protesters staged al-Quds day rallies across villages in Bahrain as a show of support for the Palestinian people. Al-Quds day is held on the last Friday of the Muslim holy fasting month of Ramadan. REUTERS/Hamad I Mohammed

(via )

Tags: bahrain gulf gcc

Words of Women from the Egyptian Revolution - Bahrain Special | Episode 9: Maryam Alkhawaja by Leilzahra

English & Spanish subs

(via )

Tags: Bahrain

insaniyat:

nickturse:

Bahraini Shiite Muslim women take part in a Labour Day pro-democracy protest in the Manama suburb of Sanabis on May 1, 2012. Hundreds of demonstrators took to the streets of Shiite villages in Bahrain to demand being reinstated in jobs from which they were fired during last year’s uprising, witnesses said. [Getty]

Because there is still news from Bahrain…

insaniyat:

nickturse:

Bahraini Shiite Muslim women take part in a Labour Day pro-democracy protest in the Manama suburb of Sanabis on May 1, 2012. Hundreds of demonstrators took to the streets of Shiite villages in Bahrain to demand being reinstated in jobs from which they were fired during last year’s uprising, witnesses said. [Getty]

Because there is still news from Bahrain…

Tags: Bahrain KSA USA

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

Manama, Bahrain: Anti-government protesters chant slogans toward riot police on April 19, 2012. Nervous shop owners closed their doors and security forces fanned out across Bahrain’s capital Thursday in attempts to quell widening unrest that threatened to overshadow the return of the Formula One Grand Prix to the U.S.-allied Gulf monarchy.

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

Manama, Bahrain: Anti-government protesters chant slogans toward riot police on April 19, 2012. Nervous shop owners closed their doors and security forces fanned out across Bahrain’s capital Thursday in attempts to quell widening unrest that threatened to overshadow the return of the Formula One Grand Prix to the U.S.-allied Gulf monarchy.

(via )

Tags: Bahrain

insaniyat:

indians-vs-cowboys:

February 24th, 2012, Bahrain’s Foreign Minister Sheikh Khaled bin Ahmed al-Khalifa and U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton at the “Friends of Syria” Conference in Tunis, Tunisia. (Photo AP)

Oh the hypocrisy…and to hold it in Tunisia of all places clinches the medal for irony. Hey, remember when Hillary said, “I really consider President and Mrs. Mubarak to be friends of my family. So I hope to see him often here in Egypt and in the United States.” in 2009? Then when asked about the future of the presidency she adamantly stated, “That’s for the people of Egypt to decide. That is a very important issue that really is up to Egyptians.”
Oh and btw, she said this in regards to the State Department’s annual human rights report, which is perennially critical of Egypt’s record in the context of an invitation for Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak to visit the United States.
I guess she must have not heard about the people of Bahrain deciding against the repressive Khalifa regime…

Do I even have to add a comment?

insaniyat:

indians-vs-cowboys:

February 24th, 2012, Bahrain’s Foreign Minister Sheikh Khaled bin Ahmed al-Khalifa and U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton at the “Friends of Syria” Conference in Tunis, Tunisia. (Photo AP)

Oh the hypocrisy…and to hold it in Tunisia of all places clinches the medal for irony. Hey, remember when Hillary said, “I really consider President and Mrs. Mubarak to be friends of my family. So I hope to see him often here in Egypt and in the United States.” in 2009? Then when asked about the future of the presidency she adamantly stated, “That’s for the people of Egypt to decide. That is a very important issue that really is up to Egyptians.”

Oh and btw, she said this in regards to the State Department’s annual human rights report, which is perennially critical of Egypt’s record in the context of an invitation for Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak to visit the United States.

I guess she must have not heard about the people of Bahrain deciding against the repressive Khalifa regime…

Do I even have to add a comment?

One year ago [March 15, 2011]: Saudi and Emarati troops (Peninsula Shield) arrived to Bahrain.

(Source: )

One year ago, online activists called for a “February 14 Revolution” on the tiny island of Bahrain. Although the ongoing mass protests might come as a surprise for some, political movements in Bahrain and the wider Arabian Gulf have a long history that stretches back a hundred years. To place these movements in context, it is necessary to delve back in history to better understand the present and what harbingers these movements hold for the future.

The region witnessed a remarkable development in 1938. Three movements emerged in Bahrain, Dubai, and Kuwait—all then under British “protection”—calling for a greater say in ruling matters, even daring to ask for a representative assembly. Although this was not the first political initiative in Bahrain, it was up until then the most coherent and organized. The movements in Bahrain and Dubai were put down, and only in Kuwait did an elected assembly emerge for a few months before being disbanded. This set the tone for future political activities in Bahrain, swinging between regime overthrow versus reform, clandestine versus public activity, and broad-based coalitions versus factional movements.

Read more at Jadaliyya

(via sharquaouia-deactivated20121015)

readytodieforbahrain:

peace—now:

Feb. 13:
A protester throws a tear gas canister back at police in Manama, Bahrain.
(Photo: Mazen Mahdi, European Pressphoto Agency)

readytodieforbahrain:

peace—now:

Feb. 13:

A protester throws a tear gas canister back at police in Manama, Bahrain.

(Photo: Mazen Mahdi, European Pressphoto Agency)

(via )

Tags: Bahrain

(Source: auzubillah, via )