It’s racist as fuck to expect uninvolved people to condemn ISIS of course but like the people that say that life in their controlled areas isn’t so bad, the people that said criticizing them is undermining the “resistance”(lots of people have told me this and unfollowed me for it.  lots,) people that derail every mention of them with “but what about x country” or semantics, people that condemn their fighters detainment in Iraqi prisons while ignoring literally every other injustice going on in Iraq: those are cases where I need some clarification on exactly where they stand.

Children of Shatila. A Film by Mai Masri.

More than 350,000 Palestinian refugees live in Lebanon, 15,000 of them in the refugee camp of Shatila in Beirut. Through the eyes of two children who live in this camp, Issa and Farah, this documentary explores the determination to keep family and dreams thriving in a landscape that has been sculpted by war, poverty, grief and displacement.

Released in 1998.

(Also if you can find her documentaries “Women of South Lebanon” and “33 Days” they are great and I recommend them.)

aslice:

never forget grace did everything first and did it better.

(Source: missgracejones, via chrisvisions)

ard-al-burtuqal:

By Emory Douglas, from The Black Panther

ard-al-burtuqal:

By Emory Douglas, from The Black Panther

(Source: fuckyeahmarxismleninism, via 4halflotus)

hassibah:

There is no question that sectarian violence is an issue that Arab governments need to address with urgency. What I find problematic in much of the current discussion around Christian insecurity in the Middle East is the oft-held assumption that ecclesiastical authorities–like Pope Francis, or the Maronite Patriarch–have a central role to play in drawing attention to this issue. Indeed, Western observers of the Middle East frequently assume that spiritual leaders are the natural leaders of Arab Christian communities, and that ultimate responsibility for representing Arab Christians falls on the shoulders of assorted bishops and patriarchs.

In my view looking to ecclesiastical authorities for political leadership is part of the problem, not the solution. And on this score I draw guidance from the case with which I am most familiar–that of Coptic Orthodox Christians in Egypt.

At the time of Egypt’s military coup on 3 July 2013, General Abd al-Fattah al-Sisi made a point of positioning the Coptic Orthodox Patriarch, Tawadros II, at his side as he announced the deposition of President Muhammad Morsi. The implicit assumption in this display was that Pope Tawadros endorsed the coup on behalf of the Coptic Christian community in Egypt. That he could adopt this role was the legacy of a fifty-year partnership between the Coptic Church and the Egyptian state, which acknowledged the Coptic pope as not just a spiritual leader but a political one as well.

During the 1940s and 1950s, the Coptic pope held no such political role, and responsibility for representing the community fell to laymen, usually lawyers and landowners, the scions of powerful notable families. After the 1952 revolution, Gamal Abdel Nasser was loathe to cooperate with these collaborators with the old regime, and turned instead to the hierarchy of the Coptic Church to represent the interests of the Coptic community.

The leaders of the Church welcomed the recognition and resources that this direct relationship with the state produced. The problem was, and remains, that political leadership concentrated in the hands of clerics only sharpens the sense of sectarian divide. The televised announcement of the 2013 coup was a case in point: The ringing endorsement of Sisi by Tawadros constructed, by design and default, the notion that the Coptic community as a whole, and on account of its Christian identity, stood with the military against the Muslim Brotherhood.

What if Pope Tawadros were to withdraw from politics altogether, and refuse to comment on political issues? Most Copts have forgotten that there was a time in which their pope was not the political figure he is today–that there once existed a Coptic political leadership independent of the pope and the church institution. The pope’s withdrawal from politics would allow for the re-emergence of a non-clerical leadership of the community–and, in turn, a less polarizing sectarian climate.

All in all, we would do well to recall that bishops, patriarchs, and popes are not the natural leaders of Middle East Christians. And to expect ecclesiastical leaders like Pope Francis to defend their parishioners against the rise of Islamists is the ultimate sectarian Catch-22.

fuckjay-z:

ft. Slick Rick, prod. by Madlib 

(via contaminatedbreastcheese)

Tags: music

The Iraqi government should promptly investigate an airstrike that hit a school housing displaced people near Tikrit on September 1, 2014. The attack killed at least 31 civilians, including 24 children, and wounded 41 others. According to three survivors, no fighters from the armed group Islamic State or other military objects were in or around the school at the time.

The attack occurred around 11:30 p.m. on September 1 on the Al-Alam Vocational High School for Industry in the Alwayi Al-Thawri neighborhood of Al-Alam, 18 kilometers northeast of the city of Tikrit. The area is under the control of Islamic State, formerly known as the Islamic State of Iraq and Sham (ISIS).

The three survivors and a local resident told Human Rights Watch that they heard an aircraft, most likely a helicopter, fly over the area shortly before midnight, followed by a large explosion at the school. The unidentified munition hit the school courtyard, where dozens of displaced people from Tikrit had gathered.

Based on a list provided by one of the survivors, the attack killed six men, eight women, and 24 children. Thirty-two people died immediately and six died later from their wounds, the survivor said. Fifteen of the 41 wounded were children.

(Source: isqineeha)

openlyawesome said: كل طيزي - am i saying "eat my ass" or "my whole ass"? كل كل طيزي - am i saying "eat my whole ass", "eat, eat my ass", or "my whole entire ass"? Arabic is a beautiful language.

redphilistine:

descentintotyranny:

The CIA’s Mop-Up Man: L.A. Times Reporter Cleared Stories With Agency Before Publication
Sep. 4 2014
A prominent national security reporter for the Los Angeles Times routinely submitted drafts and detailed summaries of his stories to CIA press handlers prior to publication, according to documents obtained by The Intercept.
Email exchanges between CIA public affairs officers and Ken Dilanian, now an Associated Press intelligence reporter who previously covered the CIA for the Times, show that Dilanian enjoyed a closely collaborative relationship with the agency, explicitly promising positive news coverage and sometimes sending the press office entire story drafts for review prior to publication. In at least one instance, the CIA’s reaction appears to have led to significant changes in the story that was eventually published in the Times.
“I’m working on a story about congressional oversight of drone strikes that can present a good opportunity for you guys,” Dilanian wrote in one email to a CIA press officer, explaining that what he intended to report would be “reassuring to the public” about CIA drone strikes. In another, after a series of back-and-forth emails about a pending story on CIA operations in Yemen, he sent a full draft of an unpublished report along with the subject line, “does this look better?” In another, he directly asks the flack: “You wouldn’t put out disinformation on this, would you?”
Read More

descentintotyranny:

The CIA’s Mop-Up Man: L.A. Times Reporter Cleared Stories With Agency Before Publication

Sep. 4 2014

A prominent national security reporter for the Los Angeles Times routinely submitted drafts and detailed summaries of his stories to CIA press handlers prior to publication, according to documents obtained by The Intercept.

Email exchanges between CIA public affairs officers and Ken Dilanian, now an Associated Press intelligence reporter who previously covered the CIA for the Times, show that Dilanian enjoyed a closely collaborative relationship with the agency, explicitly promising positive news coverage and sometimes sending the press office entire story drafts for review prior to publication. In at least one instance, the CIA’s reaction appears to have led to significant changes in the story that was eventually published in the Times.

“I’m working on a story about congressional oversight of drone strikes that can present a good opportunity for you guys,” Dilanian wrote in one email to a CIA press officer, explaining that what he intended to report would be “reassuring to the public” about CIA drone strikes. In another, after a series of back-and-forth emails about a pending story on CIA operations in Yemen, he sent a full draft of an unpublished report along with the subject line, “does this look better?” In another, he directly asks the flack: “You wouldn’t put out disinformation on this, would you?”

Read More

(via contaminatedbreastcheese)

allhoursmag:

mf doom by jaime hernandez

allhoursmag:

mf doom by jaime hernandez

(via hoppers13)

nubise:

I LOVE IT

(Source: artchipel, via hayabaks)

atane:

atane:

Poison Fire - A short film about the Niger Delta region in Nigeria.

Synopsis

The Niger Delta is an environmental disaster zone after fifty years of oil exploitation.   One and a half million tons of crude oil has been spilled into the creeks, farms and forests, the equivalent to 50 Exxon Valdez disasters, one per year. Natural gas contained in the crude oil is not being collected, but burnt off in gas flares, burning day and night for decades. The flaring produces as much greenhouse gases as 18 million cars and emits toxic and carcinogenic substances in the midst of densely populated areas. Corruption is rampant, the security situation is dire, people are dying.  But the oil keeps flowing.

Poison Firefollows a team of local activists as they gather “video testimonies” from communities on the impact of oils spills and gas flaring. We see creeks full of crude oil, devastated mangrove forests, wellheads that has been leaking gas and oil for months. We meet  people whose survival is acutely threatened by the loss of farmland, fishing and drinking water and the health hazards of gas flaring. 

We also meet meet with Jonah Gbemre, who took Shell to court over the gas flaring in his village and won a surprise victory in the court.

Ifie Lott travels to the Netherlands to attend Shell’s Annual General Meeting. She wants to ask a simple question:  Is Shell going to obey the court order and stop flaring?  There is a demonstration outside  the meeting hall. Shell’s CEO shows up for the photo op and shakes her hand, and she meets the MD of Shell-Nigeria, Basil Omiyi.  She asks him about the spills and the flaring. He patiently explains Shell’s policies and efforts for social development, but what he says is at odds with reality on the ground.

Back in the Delta, Ifie returns to the communties and shows the taped interview with Omiyo to the victims of the oil industry…

Shell ignored the federal high court ruling. The oil companies continue the illegal gas flaring. Shell has set its own “flares out” deadline to end of 2009. But they have kept saying “next year” for a decade, and in the Delta nobody believes them.

Meanwhile, the oil keeps flowing.

Poison Fire

I’m reblogging this because of a twitter chat dynamicafrica had about incidents where lack of access to clean water and/or sanitation has caused a health crisis for communities. I immediately thought of the Niger Delta.

neo-rama:

bwsimpson:

Macross: Do You Remember Love?

i remember…like it was yesterday

Man Amadam By Googoosh.

(Source: xfrs-blog, via father-zossima)

Tags: music